AACUTweets Sessions

#AACUTweets will have two sessions, to bookend the conference

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The #AACU16 @Twitter Backchannel

Thursday, Jan 21, 2:45-4pm
Constitution A
How & why to Tweet at #AACU16 in 10 minutes

We will describe—and invite you to participate in—the Annual Meeting’s Twitter “backchannel,” where participants can tweet about the panels they are at, pose questions, share links, connect with new colleagues, and bring the insights of the meeting to others worldwide. We hope to identify best practices to make this a useful tool for gaining more from the conference, and—by doing so—make participants more likely to use these methods to increase student engagement and learning at their home institutions. The presenters, part of a core group shaping the #AACU16 backchannel, also invite you to a Seminar Session on Saturday morning to discuss the backchannel and share results.

steveb 2

Constructing the #AACU16 @Twitter Backchannel

Saturday, Jan 23, 8am-9:15
Declaration B—Level 1B

This seminar will reflect on the twitter “backchannel” for the 2016 AACU conference. A twitter “backchannel” is the conversation that emerges informally online as conference participants tweet about the panels they are at, particularly as academics have discovered the utility of the twitter platform to pose questions, share links, and redirect focus to better topics in the abbreviated style of the medium. The backchannel can become a valuable medium for increasing learning and engagement for conference participants by connecting them with new colleagues, all the while reaching out and bringing the insights of the meeting to colleagues worldwide. By making the backchannel purposeful and intentional, we hope to identify best practices and, by doing so, make participants more likely to use these methods to increase student engagement and learning at their home institutions.

Speakers: Stephen Bragaw, Visiting Professor of Politics, Mark Rush, Director of International Education and Stanley D. and Nikki Waxberg Professor of Politics and Law, and Julie Kane, Head of Collection Services and Associate Professor—all of Washington and Lee University; Bryan Alexander, President, Bryan Alexander Consulting; Andrea Rehn, Associate Professor of English and Director, Digital Liberal Arts Center, Whittier College; Rebecca Frost Davis, Director for Instructional and Emerging Technology, St. Edward’s University; J. Elizabeth Clark, Professor of English, LaGuardia Community College–City University of New York

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AACUTweets Sessions

Twitter at Academic Conferences

If you’re new to Twitter or how it’s used at conferences, here is a quick round up of some reports about how Twitter has been used at academic conferences:

Kristen Mapes on Twitter at the International Medieval Congress

An Analysis of Twitter Conversations at Academic Conferences” by
Laura Gonzales

Why do You Find Twitter Useful as an Academic?” by Mark Carrigan

How Tos and Rules of Engagement (varied!)

Twitter for Academics” by Josephine Scoble

Ten Simple Rules of Live Tweeting at Scientific Conferences” by Sean Ekins and Ethan O. Perlstein

How to Live Tweet Effectively At Academic Conferences” by Mark Carrigan

The Dos and Don’ts of Live-Tweeting at an Academic Conference: A Working Draft” by Vanessa Varin

Deeper Reads:

How social media extends the conversation beyond the conference: Hacking the Academy

How People Are Using Twitter during Conferences” by Wolfgang Reinhardt, Martin Ebner, Günter Beham, and Cristina Costa

Twitter in Academic Conferences: Usage, Networking and Participation over Time” by Xidao Wen, Yu-Ru Lin, Christoph Trattner, and Denis Parra

In Public: The Shifting Consequences of Twitter Scholarship” by Bonnie Steward

Mea Culpa: on Conference Tweeting, Politeness, and Community Building” by Ryan Cordell

If You Can’t Say Anything Nice” by Kathleen Fitzpatrick

Twitter at Academic Conferences

#AACU16

Welcome to AACU Tweets, the blog behind the 2016 AAC&U Conference’s twitter back channel #AACU16.

Our goal is to intentionally create and study the twitter backchannel at the conference this January in Washington D.C.

A twitter back channel can become a valuable medium for increasing learning and engagement for conference participants by connecting individuals with new colleagues and parts of the program they aren’t able to attend, all the while reaching out and bringing the conversation and insights of the meeting to colleagues worldwide.

The twitter back channel has existed at academic conferences for several years, particularly as academics have discovered the utility of the twitter platform to pose questions, share links, and redirect focus to better topics in the short and abbreviated style of the medium.

This project intends to make this back channel intentional, by bringing together a core group of participants who were tweeting together in the #AACU2015 backchannel.

#AACU16